Can Domino’s turn pizza into health food? Sort of
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Can Domino’s turn pizza into health food? Sort of

Domino’s Pizza always seems to be one step ahead of the competition – and now, it’s trying to do it again. The innovative fast food company has created a “brain-boosting” pizza to coincide with its launch in Durham – home of a prestigious UK university – at the end of last year. The pizza is, allegedly, intended to help students with their January exams, and was designed with the help of nutritionist Caroline Innes, BSc Hons Nutrition and Health Sciences.

Domino’s share price rose by 19% last year

graph 0102 domino

SOURCE: Yahoo Finance

Innes described the pizza, and its intentions, as follows: “The brain needs a number of different nutrients to function effectively, such as glucose, vitamins and minerals, and essential fatty acids.

In collaboration with Domino’s, we have looked to use a range of toppings to create the ultimate revision treat, proven to help with cognitive function.

For example, we chose chicken because it contains B vitamins which provides the brain with neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid). Eaten in the right quantity, it could help improve concentration and memory, ahead of exams!

As to the pizza’s effectiveness – well, the jury is still out. But if you want to try it for yourself, you can order it from anywhere in the UK – provided you do it online.

Disclosure

Dominion holds Domino’s Pizza in its Global Trends Managed Fund. 


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